Saturday, August 9, 2014

Six Questions to Change Your Life


Here are six questions that I believe are worth asking and answering. The answers may or may not work for you, but consider them first before either dismissing them as completely wrong or embracing them as completely right.  They may even change your life.
Do I need a purpose?
Yes.
Why?
We are, each of us, created for a reason.  We are not accidents.  If we are accidents, and if there is no purpose to life, then life is meaningless and pointless.  This is one of the tenets of existentialism.  “Meaningless, meaningless, everything is meaningless,” as King Solomon said. 
Perhaps some can find comfort in that, but it seems like the days would be too long and that life would be too short without a reason for being here.  Perhaps the idea would mean to make the most of what we have because there’s no meaning or purpose to life, to living, but I don’t see how this could lead to anything but depression and hopelessness.
If I have a Purpose, how do I find it?
It’s an individual journey for each of us.  At the same time, it’s found by being involved in the world at some capacity.  The biggest clue is where our hearts lead us.  What excites you?   What makes you cry?  What would you do if you could do anything?  How would you change the world if you could?
Is Purpose about making the world a better place?
It’s about making your world a better place, but your world usually includes more than your immediate environment. The scope of each person’s world is different, but the world is a big place for all of us and the possibilities to make it better are infinite.  Your purpose may include autistic children you’ve never met, suffering people in countries you’ve never been to, books you’ve never read, or music that you need to compose.  Your purpose may include study or painting or hospice care.  It may be artistic or philanthropic.  It may be medical or financial.  It might mean traveling or staying home.  It might mean being in front of thousands of people, or one person at a time, or working completely alone until you’re filled with a sense of joy and completion, knowing that this day, you’ve earned your keep on this planet.
How much of my life or time do I devote to my Purpose?
You’ll know when you need to work and when you are done for now.  Characteristics of needing to work (and avoiding it) are irritability, fear, anxiety, depression or boredom.  Characteristics of being done for now are joy, confidence, and a sense that all is right with the world or that it can be.
So what do I do now?
Get Started and Keep Going.